Pink Double Hoop Cross Stitch Ring Donut by Lord Libidan

Pink Donut Cross Stitch by Lord Libidan

Pink Donut Cross Stitch by Lord Libidan
Pink Donut Cross Stitch by Lord Libidan

Title: Pink Ring Donut
Date Completed: September 2018
Design: Lord Libidan
Count: 14
Canvas: Ecru (Double hoop)
Colours: 5
Reference: Donuts
 
After the success of my micro cassette cross stitch keyrings for issue 5 of the Xstitch Mag I didn’t submit anything for issue 6. The reason, was I had an idea for issue 7; a donut.
 
The issue theme was ‘food’ and I had known about this maybe a year in advance, and went through a whole load of ideas, however it wasn’t until I wrote my post on the weird world of cross stitched food that I realised that pink donuts were a MASSIVELY popular cross stitch item. In fact, I took the ideas of Nickel And Grace Studio’s pink donut and combined it with Namaste embroidery’s double hoop idea to come up with something trully unique.
3D donut cross stitch by NickelAndGraceStudio (source: Etsy)
3D donut cross stitch by NickelAndGraceStudio (source: Etsy)

double hoop embroidery by namaste embroidery (source: namastehandembroidery.com)
double hoop embroidery by namaste embroidery (source: namastehandembroidery.com)

If you’re looking for a sweet guide on how to do this yourself, Namaste Emroidery have you covered!

3D Cross Stitch Pattern Spotlight

Earth and Moon sphere cross stitches by robinsdesign (source: Etsy)

If you couldn’t tell, I love 3D cross stitch. I first dropped into the whole 3D thing with my transforming robot cross stitch, but it was afterwards that I found the person we’re featuring this week.

3D Cross Stitch Patterns By Robin’s Designs

Earth and Moon sphere cross stitches by robinsdesign (source: Etsy)
Earth and Moon sphere cross stitches by robinsdesign (source: Etsy)

Yeh, you heard that right; instead of focusing on just one pattern this week, we’re focusing on Robin’s Design as a whole. You may have seen their work on the site before, as part of the best 3D cross stitch or maybe saw her listed as my inspiration for my Harry Potter Golden Snitch cross stitch.
Unlike anyone else I’ve been able to find in the cross stitch pattern community, Robin’s Design produces amazing, and complex 3D objects, like globes, animals, people, characters, dice and more, yet somehow always makes the patterns super esy to follow. If you haven’t already, you NEED to check out her Etsy, as frankly, its amazing. There are over 100 3D patterns!
 
This pattern was found on Etsy.

Glass or No Glass; Whats Best When Framing Cross Stitch?

Parts of a artwork frame (Source: agora-gallery.com)

When it comes to finishing your cross stitch, there aren’t many things that go through your head other than “I need to show this to everyone!”, however many people feel unsure or confused about framing. However, that really doesn’t need to be the case. We’ve got a detailed guide on how to frame cross stitch on the blog already, but there is one big question that keeps coming up; should I add glass or not?
 
Sadly, this is one of those questions that doesn’t have an absolute answer. Sometimes you should, and sometimes you shouldn’t.

When You Should

In most cases, when you frame cross stitch, you should use glass. There are loads of benefits, such as keeping it clean, stopping strong sunlight and making it look more professional. However all of those things can only be achieved if you frame your cross stith correctly. Let’s look at the parts of a frame to get a better look at this:

Parts of a artwork frame (Source: agora-gallery.com)
Parts of a artwork frame (Source: agora-gallery.com)

When you want to protect it

As you can see from above, there are loads of parts to a standard frame, and each of these has their own purpose. The big two we’ll look at though, are the glass (obviously) and the window mat. This window mat is often the thing people forget, however its purpose is to keep the work away from the glass. In most cases this isn’t too important, but when it comes to cross stitch, where the stitches extend beyond the aida, its super important. Without it, the stitches get squashed against the frame.

When its required for the pattern

Sometimes however, you might need to get rid of the matting. And that’s fine! Take my Star Trek Voyager LCARS cross stitch for example. I wanted to make it look like it was a computer screen on a wall, and as a result putting in matting would ruin the look. But I still used glass. How did I get away with that? I used spacers. There are loads of different types, but they all work the same way; small bits of plastic that push the glass away from the cross stitch.

Star Trek Voyager LCARS Blueprint cross stitch by Lord Libidan
Star Trek Voyager LCARS Blueprint cross stitch by Lord Libidan

You don’t like the look of framed work

But what if you don’t like the idea of framed work? Well, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t frame it. Take a look at the example below I found on Reddit. It’s a pacman screenshot cross stitch, fairly average (although well stitched) and when framing it, they added a bold yellow matting. The framing technique here has allowed the whole piece to stand out like a classic arcade cabinet. Now, bright yellow might not work for the cross stitch you’re doing, but by using clever framing, you can not only add to the cross stitch, but elevate it.

Pacman screenshot cross stitch in frame by gmatom (Source: reddit)
Pacman screenshot cross stitch in frame by gmatom (Source: reddit)

When You Should Not

Now, that said, there are times when you should ditch the glass. By doing this, you’ll loose the benefits of having glass, so you need to be more careful (see our tips at the bottom of the page) but sometimes glass just won’t work.

When you don’t like the glass

Yes, you can have a glass preference. 😛
When it comes to glass, some people don’t like the shine it creates, and if your artwork is somewhere glare is a problem, then you might know what I mean. So glass companies came up with solutions. Two specifically. The first is a slightly bumpy textured glass, which in my opinion makes the artwork harder to see. If you had a small count, this wouldn’t work. Equally, there is another type with a green coating on it (like eye glasses) which ruins the look if you’ve stitching with anything other than green.
The only solution? Ditch the glass.

Glasses with anti-glare coating (Source: youtube)
Glasses with anti-glare coating (Source: youtube)

When its required for the pattern

The other instance when you might not include glass is when its required for the pattern. Now, there really aren’t many patterns like this, so I’ve had to use another example of mine. In the below Pokemon 3D cave cross stitch you can see the cross stitch extends out of the frame, by nearly 30cm. There was no way I could frame this with glass, so I had to ditch it.

3D Pokemon Cave Cross Stitch by Lord Libidan, bottom view
3D Pokemon Cave Cross Stitch by Lord Libidan, bottom view

Tips for framing without glass

As seen above, sometimes there is a valid reason for not framing with glass, and honestly, that’s not a problem. However there are impacts of not framing with glass. With these tips, you should be able to keep those to a minimum!

  • Make sure its washed and ironed before you frame it; it’ll last longer
  • Keep it away from direct sunlight; the threads will keep their color longer
  • Use a special acid-free backing paper for framing to stop dust leeching into the artwork

Coca Cola Cross Stitch Pattern Spotlight

Coca Cola Can Cross Stitch Pattern by DJStitches (Source: Etsy)

When searching on Etsy we found a list of the most searched terms related to cross stitch patterns. Along side some obvious ones, we found something we were a little surprised by; coca cola.

Coca Cola Can Cross Stitch Pattern by DJStitches

Coca Cola Can Cross Stitch Pattern by DJStitches (Source: Etsy)
Coca Cola Can Cross Stitch Pattern by DJStitches (Source: Etsy)

Whilst there is a wealth of coke related cross stitch pattern goodness on Etsy, most are old adverts or christmas related. However most people search for Coke patterns in spring and summer. My memories of that time normally relate to cracking open a can. So of course, I had to pick a Coca Cola can.
DJStitches, who made this pattern, is a bit of a cross stitch can specialist, with all of the images made pixel by pixel. Whilst this isn’t particularly important normally, when choosing the reds for the can, its super important. By hand picking colors you can ensure that the image you see above, is the image you’re going to get stitched, making it a truly wonderful example of that classic Coke.
More of a diet coke fan? He has one of those too.
 
This pattern was found on Etsy.

Summer Cross Stitch Pattern Spotlight

Summer Window Cross Stitch Pattern by MariBoriEmbroidery (Source: Etsy)

Finding a cross stitch pattern that shows off any season can be hard, but summer is a particularlly hard one. With summers looking different everywhere, and frankly there are only so many sun images you can take.

Summer Window Cross Stitch Pattern by MariBoriEmbroidery

Summer Window Cross Stitch Pattern by MariBoriEmbroidery (Source: Etsy)
Summer Window Cross Stitch Pattern by MariBoriEmbroidery (Source: Etsy)

And that’s why this week, we’re showing off this summer window by MariBoriEmbroidery. Unlike any of the other summer patterns I looked out, it doesn’t involve a sun, its a generic background, and doesn’t have any fancy words. But what it does have, is feeling. The subtle net curtains made up using sashiko, with heavier parts thanks to double patterns, it makes it look like the curtains are flowing in the soft summer wind.
 
This pattern was found on Etsy.

Find The Perfect Hair Color – DMC Threads

Hair Color Cross Stitch Thread Table by Lord Libidan

We have a lot of people using our skin tone thread image to replace skin tones in cross stitch patterns. However we also get a lot of requests for hair colors too. So without further ado, we present the best hair colors for replacement in cross stitch patterns.
Just pick your hair type (blonde, brown, black, grey or red) and pikc a color of the main body of hair from the left hand column, and you’ll see the best highlights and shadows.

Hair Color Cross Stitch Thread Table by Lord Libidan
Hair Color Cross Stitch Thread Table by Lord Libidan

Hair Color Cross Stitch Thread Table 2 by Lord Libidan
Hair Color Cross Stitch Thread Table 2 by Lord Libidan

We’ve also created this second table so you can look up colors slightly different. It’s the same info, just a different format!

Tea Cross Stitch Pattern Spotlight

Octopus Tea Cross Stitch Pattern by LoLaLottaShop (Source: Etsy)

This week’s pattern spotlight has been seen on the site before. In fact, we used it as an example of a great cross stitch pattern on our how to make sure you buy a quality cross stitch pattern post.

Octopus Tea Cross Stitch Pattern by LoLaLottaShop

Octopus Tea Cross Stitch Pattern by LoLaLottaShop (Source: Etsy)
Octopus Tea Cross Stitch Pattern by LoLaLottaShop (Source: Etsy)

An octopus with a space pattern jumping out of a tea cup may not be the first thing you think of when you think about a cross stitch pattern relating to tea, but we’d argue that this pattern is exactly like a cup of tea. When looking at tea patterns we found a whole slew of cups, kettles, tea bags and other tea related items, but that’s exactly what they were; just items. This pattern, sold by LoLaLottaShop but designed by Vik Dollin shows what its like sipping a cup of tea. The complex flavour battling together is like the wild space design, whilst its warm, calming, hugs from many hands feeling is like an octopus giving you a hug. This pattern is a fantastic example of what drinking tea really is.
It helps that its totally unique too; how many other octopus/space/tea hybrid cross stitch patterns are there?
Finally, it should be noted that we included this pattern on a list of how to find great cross stitch patterns online. It was such a good pattern, that we featured it. If that’s not a show of admiration, I don’t know what is.
 
This pattern was found on Etsy.

How to Make Sure You Buy a Quality Cross Stitch Pattern

Octopus Tea Cross Stitch Pattern by LoLaLottaShop (Source: Etsy)

With websites like Etsy, eBay and a whole host of other sites selling cross stitch patterns, you could be fooled into thinking all of these cross stitch patterns are going to great to stitch. But the frank, and sometimes disappointing truth is that some, even most, are bad patterns.
Whilst that might not seem too bad considering the cost of some of these cross stitch patterns are less than $5, however do you really want to spend 100 hours stitching to find only at the end that the pattern didn’t live up to the hype?
Well I’m here to help you pick the best quality cross stitch patterns, everytime. With these 5 simple rules, you can make sure the cross stitch pattern will come out like its supposed to.

Is there a stitched example?

The first thing to think about when selecting a cross stitch pattern is how it looks. Not the design, but how it looks stitched.
A lot of sellers, particularly on Etsy, sell patterns without ever stitching them. This is worrying for two reasons; firstly you don’t know how the image actually looks with threads; just computer generated Xs. Secondly, with no one actually stitching it, you don’t know if its full of confetti or not. As a result, I would NEVER buy a pattern without seeing a real stitched example.
But that doesn’t mean any post without a stitched example should be avoided. Let me explain using two examples of good patterns from Etsy.

Octopus Tea Cross Stitch Pattern by LoLaLottaShop (Source: Etsy)
Octopus Tea Cross Stitch Pattern by LoLaLottaShop (Source: Etsy)

Stitched examples of Octopus Tea Cross Stitch Pattern by LoLaLottaShop (Source: Etsy)
Stitched examples of Octopus Tea Cross Stitch Pattern by LoLaLottaShop (Source: Etsy)

The above pattern is a great example of someone who shows a stitched example, they have 8 pictures of 6 stitched examples on their store front. You can see, this is a great pattern. Our second example below however only has the inital computer make pattern image:
Giant Squid vs Great White Shark Cross Stitch Pattern by Richearts (Source: Etsy)
Giant Squid vs Great White Shark Cross Stitch Pattern by Richearts (Source: Etsy)

However, with some searching in the comments on the shop, you can see 4 different stitched examples by customers. This pattern, is a good one. They just haven’t stitched it themselves. So sometimes, you have to go searching!

Look for stitch and color counts

When it comes to cross stitch patterns, sometimes, you need it to be high detail. And that’s great, but when you put an image through a cross stitch pattern generator without knowing what you’re doing, it comes out massive, with a lot of colors, and whole load of confetti.
Once again, we’ll look at the Octopus Tea cross stitch pattern by LoLaLottaShop on Etsy. In the octopus you have a wave of colors and detail. But they’ve specifially gone through the image to both reduce the size, amount of colors and still keep the design to a high standard. However looking at the below example I’ve recreated another way; making it big, and adding as many colors as I could. In the below example is over 300 stitches wide, and has over 50 colors. Yet the quality, is clearly not as good.

Bad Quality Cross Stitch Pattern
Bad Quality Cross Stitch Pattern

A big pattern will look like it has a lot of detail, however the sacrafice is a lot of threads (which can cost a fortune) and making it truly hell to stitch.

Is it copyrighted?

Yes. Copyright; everyone’s least favorite topic. Sadly, in cross stitch copyright is a serious problem. A simple tip often used is to ask yourself “is it a recognisable character/image?” and normally, you can side step most major copyright holders. However, that doesn’t mean the pattern you’re about to buy isn’t copyrighted.
Imagine a pattern that envokes feelings of Disney; its fan art of some kind. Looks like a painting. It’s nicely done. This might not be copyrighted by Disney, as its fan art. But the maker of the cross stitch pattern is almost definately not the artwork’s original creator. That original creator, has copyright on his image. ALWAYS look to see any copyright messaging on cross stitch patterns before you buy. Using our Octopus Tea Cross Stitch Pattern again, we can see a little message in the notes:

“Octopus” counted cross stitch pattern. Designed by Vik Dollin.

We can see that this pattern has been made by someone else and the permission was given to make a cross stitch pattern. You should always be able to see a message like this, even if it is created by the pattern designer.

Is the price super low? Its probably stolen.

Another possible issue plaguing sites like Etsy are stolen patterns. Some people purchase a pattern from a reputable place, such as floss and mischief, who recently won awards for her cross stitch patterns two years running, and then they’ll sell them on at a really really low price.
As a result, you should look at price. Most cross stitch patterns (not kits) sell between $5 and $20, based on size and complexity. However a quick search of Etsy and I can see some patterns sold for as low as 20 cents. No designer worth their salt can produce quality patterns for anything less than $5 a time.
If you see any lower than that, they’re either stolen from someone or seriously poor quality.
When researching for this post we actually found my Pokemon Great Wave Cross Stitch sold, using my images. The issue is that I’ve never released this pattern. Instead they put my image, with watermark through pattern making software. The result was nothing like the original, and even included my watermark…

Is it from a reputable source?

This one is a little more difficult to judge. If you were to buy a pattern from, lets say peacock & fig you’d know its a quality pattern. The reason, is that she’s a real designer (who does it as a day job) and is bound by laws as she’s making her living from it. But places like Etsy and eBay are known to have issues with copyright. Therefore you need to be far more careful when selecting patterns from these sites. Equally, the rise of Aliexpress in cross stitch is a serious problem; a lot of these patterns are stolen, of bad quality or just knock off (don’t start us about the kits), therefore I wouldn’t suggest buying any patterns.

Don’t swap

OK, this one isn’t actually about finding quality cross stitch patterns, but it is important (its also our 6th point, sorry!). Cross stitch designers regularly make little to no profit and so when you find a pattern you like; don’t give it to a friend once you’re finished. Tell them about it, so they can buy a copy themselves. If everyone shared their patterns; the best designers wouldn’t be able to make more patterns.
 
And that’s it! With a few simple steps you can see if the pattern you want to buy, is going to be a good one or not. I hope this helps, and enjoy never having a bad pattern ever again!

Matrix Code Cross Stitch by Lord Libidan

Matrix Code Cross Stitch by Lord Libidan

Matrix Code Cross Stitch by Lord Libidan
Matrix Code Cross Stitch by Lord Libidan

Title: Matrix Code
Date Completed: April 2019
Design: Lord Libidan
Count: 18
Canvas: Black
Colours: 3
Pop Culture: The Matrix Trilogy
 
It’s rare for me to continue editing a pattern whilst stitching a project. It is, after all, the worst time possible to change a cross stitch pattern. However, that didn’t stop me with this project! I edited it 4 times during stitching.
I guess we should start back at the beginning. I had just finished 4 back to back Pikachu on my animated running Pikachu cross stitch, and I hadn’t got anything to stitch. That isn’t a new problem, in fact, I’ve spoken about getting cross stitch inspiration before, but unlike previous times, this was on purpose. I know that might sound crazy, but I stitch a lot of different things, from loads of areas, and wanted to go back to basics and see what really excited me. From the back of this I came up with a load of big projects, however there was one that I thought would be small. I was wrong.
I’ve done a lot of interface/computer screen stitches in the past, like my Voyager Star Trek LCARS cross stitch and really wanted to do something similar. I had just so happened to see that it was the 10 year anniversary of The Matrix and I remembered one of the best computer screens in cinema history. The Matrix code.
I grabbed an image of the code from wikipedia and started charting and soon realised, that despite the apparent simplicity of the code, it was actually super complicated. So my first step was to create a whole cross stitch alphabet but much like the original code, I needed letters that looked recognisable, but weren’t. I made a total of 29 characters, which I then had to put through a random number generator to place each letter in a massive grid. I had originally wanted to make a massive pattern, however less than 1/10th of the way through the pattern was taking me AGES. And whilst it was far from a 100 hour cross stitch pattern, it was too much.
I cut the pattern down, and finished the pattern.
Matrix Code (Source: Wikipedia)
Matrix Code (Source: Wikipedia)

At this point all seemed good, I picked out 18 count fabric to get nice small letters, and make it fit a rough landscape frame. However, when stitching, and rewatching The Matrix, I realised that 90s screens aren’t landscape, they were square. So the first cut came in the form of the pattern becoming a lot more square (not perfectly however). The second change came in the form of an error on my part. Instead of the whole height, I missed out two letters (I really should have gridded by cross stitch). I cut the pattern down again, followed by a further reduction in width after I realised the pattern wouldn’t be square enough. Finally, I cut the last line of code off as I ran out of green DMC 700.
However, despite all of that, its still too big to frame, looks too much like Japanese and is too bright. However, I REALLY loved stitching this. I haven’t approached a lot of 90s movies, prefering the 80s, and really loved the computer screen part of it. I recon the whole nothing to stitch thing worked.
The Matrix screenshot (Source: are.na)
The Matrix screenshot (Source: are.na)

Dinosaur Cross Stitch Pattern Spotlight

TRex Cross Stitch Pattern by SongThread (Source: Etsy)

For this weeks cross stitch pattern spotlight we have a double feature. I really struggled on picking which one of these patterns to go with, so went with both!

Dinosaur Cross Stitch Patterns By SongThread

TRex Cross Stitch Pattern by SongThread (Source: Etsy)
TRex Cross Stitch Pattern by SongThread (Source: Etsy)

Triceratops Cross Stitch Pattern by SongThread (Source: Etsy)
Triceratops Cross Stitch Pattern by SongThread (Source: Etsy)

This weeks theme, is dinosaurs. Whilst you can find a whole load of Jurassic Park inspired cross stitch patterns online, its rare to see a skeleton. Mostly, this is down to how dang hard they are to turn into patterns. However SongThread has not only managed to make super accurate dino skeletons, but put a whole load of fun into them with the addition of a crazy cat. Whilst I’m a self confessed dog fan, these are just too good to pass up.
 
This pattern was found on Etsy.