Tips For Travelling With Your Cross Stitch

On of the most googled questions about cross stitch is still about taking it traveling. And whilst there are a whole host of people giving advice on taking cross stitch needles on planes, actually taking it is a whole different thing.
 
You have to think about size of project, stuff to bring, how much space you’re going to have, how to keep your work from getting dirty, and making sure you don’t loose your needle! So we’ve decided to give you a run down on the best tips for travelling with your cross stitch.

Sewing on a plane (source: twitter)
Sewing on a plane (source: twitter)

Can You Take Cross Stitch Supplies On A Plane?

Let’s get the biggie out the way first; yes, you can take your cross stitch supplies on a plane.

You may place your knitting needles and needlepoint tools in carry-on or checked baggage.

TSA Official Guidelines


That said, you should still consider taking something like snip scissors as sharp and pointed scissors can cause delays at the airport.
So, what tips can I give you?

Don’t Take Something You’ll Miss

Let’s start with a tip that’ll probably put you on a downer right away; don’t take something you care about. Being super realistic, taking cross stitch travelling increases the likelihood of it getting dirty, damaged or even lost, by a considerable amount. Don’t take that heirloom piece that’s been in your family for 30 years; you’re asking for trouble.

Take A Smaller Project

That said, I would also suggest taking something small. This actually has three points to it. The first reflects the point above, take a small travel project, that isn’t your main piece, but one that’ll keep up your interest during travel.
Secondly, depending on your method of travel, space might be an issue. On planes, you rarely have enough space to reach out your arm, and no one will appreciate you trying it with a needle hanging off the end, even if it is a tapesty needle.
Thirdly; how are you going to take it with you? The is simply no way you can fit the 2 meters long epic Pokemon generations cross stitch with you. Smaller will help you here.

Pack A Project Bag

Now that you’ve picked a smaller project, let’s think about actually taking it somewhere. So you need a place to store it. The first thing I would suggest is getting a cross stitch travel kit. As per our cross stitch gift guide you can pick one up for about $30, including all needles, snip scissors, a couple of bobbins, magnet, etc.
Secondly, you need a project bag. This can pretty much come in any form, from a resealable food bag to a handbag, but so long as its clean, and tan store your cross stitch; it’s worth it. Just make sure you don’t chuck the rest of your travel gear in the bag too; it’s for cross stitch only.

Altoids Tin Travel Cross Stitch Kit (Source: red-handledscissors.com)

Put Your Hoop On Backwards

This is where we get onto the slightly weird things; we’re going to suggest you put your cross stitch in the hoop backwards. Yes, backwards. Normally you place the cross stitch on the outside, however when traveling this area will rub on the bag, possibly getting your work dirty. But by flipping the cross stitch to the inside of the hoop, you save yourself the possibility of dirt and damage.

Take A Reading Light

Finally, we suggest taking a light. It doesn’t have to be a fancy day light bulb or anything, but taking an additional light, even if its a cheap reading light, will help you in the darker moments of travel…

 

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3 thoughts on “Tips For Travelling With Your Cross Stitch

  1. One tip I’ve heard is to take a dental floss container – it has a built-in cutter and I can’t imagine any TSA would confiscate it.

  2. Great suggestions! I travel a lot and do all of these things. I have only encountered a problem with my scissors changing planes in Sydney Australia. I had small snip scissors and the Aussie-TSA took them. It meant that I had a wonderful afternoon in a local needlework store in Auckland, NZ. Beware of bringing scissors of any size into Australia, even though you are only passing through!

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