How To Organize Your Cross Stitch Patterns

I’m a big fan of keeping your craft space neat, tidy and organized. At any time, you might just want to go through your kit to find that one item you brought 5 years ago and will get around to using. In the past we’ve covered how to store cross stitch threads, and went into some length about why its important, and we’ve covered how to store your cross stitch needles too.
But there is always one thing we’ve shied away from. And frankly, if you’re anything like me, this will be the messiest part of your craft space. Cross stitch patterns.
 
Unlike any other tool in cross stitch, cross stitch patterns pose a unique issue. Firstly, you have tonnes of them. You see a pattern, be it a free cross stitch pattern or paid, and you just have to pick it up. In addition, you have all of those patterns you’ve completed, but want to hold onto. This is only exacerbated if you design cross stitch patterns as well, adding a third layer to your cross stitch collection.
And secondly, they aren’t the easiest things to store. Much like storing finished cross stitch you want to keep them in a good enough condition that they last, but they’re made of paper, which tends not to last.
So, we’ve scoured the internet and tried a whole series of storage methods to round up the best for you.

Digitally

We start with an obvious one, but one that doesn’t get that much recognition.
We would strongly suggest making a copy of any cross stitch pattern you have anyway, as the life of a digital file will be far longer than even the best-kept paper document. In addition, many of the patterns you see in places like Etsy are downloaded files, meaning many, if not all, of your patterns, are digital anyway. So why keep around the printed versions?
Don’t get me wrong, I also prefer a printed pattern when I’m actually using it, but with a great printer for cross stitch patterns, you can always print new sheets on demand (and depending on which printer you get, cheaply too).

Great For:

  • Large volume of patterns
  • Long term storage (and a saftey net)
  • Storing free/downloaded cross stitch patterns

Bad for:

  • Viewing cross stitch patterns
  • Easily using cross stitch patterns
  • Cross stitch kits
Green Lake Reflected Color Cross Stitch Print (Source: solidrop.com)
Green Lake Reflected Color Cross Stitch Print (Source: solidrop.com)

Binders

The second method we’re going to suggest is binders, portfolios or binder notebooks. The great thing about these babies is that you can store printed patterns in clear sheets, so you can see them (or at least the first page). They’re cheap, and if you use page protectors you can keep the patterns for a long time. You can store them in a filing cabinet too.
I personally keep all of my completed cross stitches in these too, meaning I can keep a copy of the pattern with the cross stitch itself.
There are downsides though. The biggest being what you do with digital patterns. With digital stores taking over the cross stitch world, and no sign of them slowing down, its likely that your digital stash is going to grow to massive levels. Unless you plan to print them all (think of the trees!) you’ll have to keep printed and non-printed patterns separate. And a smaller issue is epic patterns. Our epic all generations pokemon cross stitch pattern racks 210 pages. That’s bigger than a lot of novels. If you like epic patterns, you might want to stay away from this method.

Great For:

  • Printed cross stitch patterns
  • Viewing cross stitch patterns
  • Easily using cross stitch patterns
  • Cross stitch kits

Bad for:

  • Long term storage
  • Storing free/downloaded cross stitch patterns
  • Epic cross stitch patterns
A clear page protector art portfolio (source: Google images)
A clear page protector art portfolio (source: Google images)

Hangers

A new one on us until we started this post, was hangers. Yes, you read that correctly. Get yourself a hanging rail (or use a wardrobe), get some trouser clip hangers, and hang your cross patterns. You can even use clear pouches to keep them a little neater (and store threads if you have kits). You need to be a little careful you don’t overweight the hangers (some epic patterns are too heavy), and this only works if you have a smaller collection of patterns too. However that said, it’s also a great way of keeping track of patterns you’re halfway through!

Great For:

  • Smaller cross stitch patterns collections
  • Viewing cross stitch patterns
  • Easily using cross stitch patterns
  • Cross stitch kits

Bad for:

  • Large cross stitch patterns collections
  • Storing free/downloaded cross stitch patterns
  • Long term storage

Homemade Cross Stitch Pattern Holders by Ms_Pebbles (Source scrapbook.com)
Homemade Cross Stitch Pattern Holders by Ms_Pebbles (Source scrapbook.com)

What’s your preferred way to store patterns? We’d love to hear of ways we might have missed!

 

 

Consider following us on social!

Get exclusive giveaways, free patterns, guides and be first to see the most recent posts!
 
Instagram   Twitter   Facebook   Pinterest   DeviantART   RSS Feed
 
 

You Might Also Like

3 thoughts on “How To Organize Your Cross Stitch Patterns

  1. Creating digital copies of paper charts you have purchased has potential copyright issues. While some designers allow you to make a working copy that should be destroyed when done stitching, not all do. And also for digital copies, what happens when your hard drive dies and you haven’t backed all those patterns up? (As I make myself a note to do a computer backup very soon!)

    1. Hey Mel,
      Despite what some designers say, you are always allowed to copy paper charts for personal use, and they don’t have to be destroyed after stitching. Many designers say that just to avoid people sharing patterns with friends.

  2. Thank you for the storage options. I have a lot of paper patterns, and a couple of kits. They stay in their original packaging until I am ready to use them. They are in an old steamer trunk, sorted by category like wildlife, Halloween. wizards and dragons, scenic. The trunk stays closed and lives under my sewing cutting table. It seems to be working so far, and some of those patterns are OLD.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.